More Help for Feral Cats

We hope you have found our series on feral cat care informative.  If you have missed any of the series, here are the links: First Step; Stray, Feral, Pet; The Feral Fix; Why TNR; Cat Colony Care; TNR: Humane Trapping; and Colony Carer Help.  We are still looking to hear from people involved with feral cats – carers, vets who offer low-cost help with feral cat colonies, someone who has a adopted a former feral or kitten from a feral litter.  Leave a comment below to tell us your story or let us know if you’d like to contribute your story as an interview or guest blog.

To wrap up this series, we have researched other feral cat organizations around the US and world.  If you are outside of the Cats in Tow area, consider getting involved with one of the organizations below or something similar.  These organizations are committed to spaying/neutering, keeping adult cats healthy and preventing kittens from being born into the wild and without adoption placements and ultimately, killed by many overcrowded shelters who don’t have any other options. 

Spaying/neutering your own animal, donating money or supplies to shelters, volunteering at shelters, adopting a shelter animal, caring for feral cat colonies, getting the word out about spaying and neutering.  There is so much you can do!

Around the US:

Alley Cat Allies, Making Connections

Orange County SPCA, Additional Resources

Sacramento Feral Resources

Forgotten Feral Cat Rescue, Michigan

List for organizations in Massachusetts

List for organizations in Western Washington state and beyond

Aggie Cat Services, Utah State University 

Neighborhood Cats, New York City

Around the world:

Toronto Feral Cat Coalition

Quadra (British Columbia) Cats

Cats Assistance to Sterilize (C.A.T.S.), Australia

United Kingdom, Celia Hammond Animal Trust

This is by no means an exhaustive list, just a quick survey of the web to show how many cats out there need your help.  If you don’t find your area above, search online. There is sure to be an organization near you.

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Why TNR

Why does Cats in Tow believe that trap, neuter, release programs are the best for feral cats?  We believe that every cat deserves a chance at a happy life.  The best scenario would be for every cat to have a warm, safe home where they were adequately fed, received attention and were kept healthy.  That is not the reality for many, many cats though.
 
Just because these cats don’t have a human address, does that mean they are unwanted or should not be cared for?  Cats in Tow does not think so.  Feral cats are not going to make good pets (except on very rare occasions).  It is best that they are left where they are, which also keeps the population of feral cats stable. 
 
However, they need to be spayed or neutered, for their own health, to reduce the problems associated with mating and to keep them from producing more kittens (an un-spayed female cat can be responsible for over 3200 kittens according to the National Pet Alliance).
 
TNR also gives the people caring for the feral cats a chance to check their health, manage parasites and assess whether it is possible to transfer kittens to a life with humans. 
 
We’ll go into specifics on upcoming blogs about how to get a TNR program started and resources for people who are assisting with a feral cat colony in their community.  If you are curious about the science behind TNR, Alley Cat Allies have a list of scientific studies here).
 
Are you supporting a feral cat colony?  Please send us a message to tell us about your experiences.